Online Now 1659

Phillip's Lunchtime Musings, Oct. 17

Back at home after Auburn's historic 65-43 victory over Arkansas on Saturday night, I wasted five minutes of my time watching ESPN's Lou Holtz and Mark May debate whether Auburn or Oklahoma is the better team and whether one of them should be No. 1.

No doubt, it's a scripted "argument." May was pumping Auburn and Holtz was all about Oklahoma. That's cool. But Holtz, who was once a pretty good coach and never a pretty good analyst, was, well, ridiculous. He repeatedly referred to Auburn as a "one-man team." I guess it's a bad thing to have a great player at quarterback.

A one-man team? Josh Bynes, who has intercepted passes at the most crucial times in two big wins, might wonder about that. So might Darvin Adams, who caught 60 passes last season from Chris Todd and is, for my money, the best clutch receiver in the SEC. Four senior offensive linemen, all of whom will probably be chosen in the NFL draft, might wonder about that statement. So might Antonio Goodwin, who blocked a punt, or Onterio McCalebb, who returned a kickoff 99 yards.

Zac Etheridge, who made a game-saving tackle against Clemson, knocked the ball loose in the end zone so Demond Washington could make a game-clinching interception against South Carolina and returned a fumble for a touchdown to turn the game in Auburn's favor against Arkansas, might wonder about that statement, too.

Nick Fairley, who leads the SEC in tackles for loss and sacks, would surely be puzzled by Holtz's words.

Would Auburn be as good without Newton? Clearly it would not. But there are a lot of teams that wouldn't be as good if they lost their starting quarterbacks. If that's the best argument Holtz has, that's pretty weak.

But then again, consider the source. ...

One of the bigger games in the history of Jordan-Hare Stadium is upon us. No. 5 Auburn and No. 6 LSU will match unbeaten records next Saturday. It will be a fascinating matchup between the best offense in the SEC and the best defense in the SEC. The winner will emerge as the SEC's top national championship contender and the favorite to win the West, though both still must play once-beaten Alabama. ...

If Arkansas' Bobby Petrino isn't the best offensive coach in college football, he's close (Gus Malzahn ain't bad, either). No one is better at finding your weakness and beating it to death. That was on full display Saturday at Jordan-Hare. ...

Kentucky's 31-28 win over South Carolina was remarkably similar to its 37-34 loss to Auburn, but this it was the Wildcats, who trialed 28-10 at halftime, making the plays to win in the end. They scored 17 unanswered points against Auburn before losing and 21 unanswered points to beat South Carolina. South Carolina blew a coverage on fourth down to allow the go-ahead touchdown pass and Stephen Garcia made a remarkably bad decision and threw the interception that ended it. ...

I felt bad for Florida's kicker, seeing as how he's actually a punter who has been forced into the job because of injury. His miss that sealed Mississippi State's 10-7 victory was entirely predictable. I guess it sounds mean, but it was amusing to watch Urban Meyer, who seems to believe the college football world revolves around him. I have to brag a little here and point out that I picked that upset. I don't know if you noticed, but Mississippi State threw just one pass the entire second half. ...

How topsy-turvy are things in the SEC East? Suddenly Georgia can dream of getting to Atlanta to play for the SEC championship. After losing four straight, the Bulldogs have looked really, really good the past two games. Of course, those games have been against Tennessee and Vanderbilt. ...

Until next time ...

Already have an account? Sign In